Distributed OSGi – On The Scent Of Red Herrings

red-herring_color.jpgSo, this morning my alarm clock was inexplicably set to the central time zone and consequently I arose 2 hours before my regularly scheduled time. Unable or unwilling to go back to bed after my morning “get ready for work” rituals, I settled down to read a few articles from my RSS feeds. The first one I read was a rather odd post on Distributed OSGi – Tilting at Windmills by Roger Voss. Laughing a bit as I read the opening paragraph, I didn’t think much more about the post as it really had nothing to do with what the OSGi RFP 119 “Distributed OSGi” really is about. Fortunately or unfortunately, several people started peppering me with tweets, IMs and emails asking if I had read the post in question and what were my thoughts about it. So, here they are.
Basically, I’m not really going to defend the OSGi EEG RFC 119, “Distributed OSGi” as my own interest in the matter rested largely with the acquisition of the so called “registry hooks” which allow infrastructure developers such as myself to hook into the queries of the OSGi service registry and do cool things like manifest services on demand. Once this capability was present and decoupled from the 119 RFC, I felt I had all the tools I needed to do any damn thing I wanted to, regardless of what the 119 RFC was doing. (for background as to how I fell in love with the idea of the registry hooks, see my posts on remote OSGi, which predated the RFC 119 here and here and a post during the formulation of the RFP which led to RFC 119 here)

Continue reading

My Dinner With Andre

Our Glorious LeaderWell, after my last blog entry regarding Sun and JSR 277, I received a visit from the enforcers of that fine establishment. Wearing heavy overcoats on a nice sunny day, the elevator door opened and they came rushing out. Like a scene from the Matrix, it seemingly took them forever to pull out their impossibly huge automatic weapons they had hidden under the black leather trench coats. In only several hundred milliseconds, Sun’s professional enforcers unloaded 20 or 30 pounds of lead in the form of hundreds upon hundreds of rounds of high powered ammunition into what used to be my body, splattering my physical essence across the interior of the reception area of building 200 on the Geidi Prime campus.
Or not. Rather, what did happen was Alex and Stanley showed up at my office escorted by a fellow member of House Harkonnen and after a slightly awkward moment with Stanley (I had, after all, just blasted across the internet – with the awesome power of my blog – stating that he was an idiot), Stanley and my compatriot excused themselves to work on JSR 277 related specification business leaving Alex Buckley and I in my office, as I watched him finger a menacing looking lead pipe that he pulled from his brief case.
Or not. Rather, we sat down and talked comfortably for quite some time about about everything but the issues surrounding JSR 277 and the reason why Alex even knew of my existence. Eventually, however, we directed the conversation towards the actual issues we really needed to discuss and left the safe domain of my Dr. Who toy collection and the pleasantries of traveling through Heathrow in the U.K.

Continue reading