Event Driven Autonomic Management – Preliminaries

Update: Part II – the long kiss goodnight, Part III – The First Cut is the Deepest
This is the first in a series of posts documenting the research I’ve been doing into a different way of thinking about system management infrastructure. For quite some time, I’ve been obsessed with the idea of how to simply and effectively manage large scale systems. Throughout this obsession, I’ve travelled down various roads and found myself in several box canyons along the way. I’ve tried out a lot of different strategies and have finally settled into something which provides the kind of framework I’ve been looking for which I haven’t found replicated anywhere.
Note that I’m certainly not making the claim that it is “Teh Best” management infrastructure. Rather, what I’m making the claim is that it’s the most interesting management architecture to me. As anyone who knows me can testify, I have rather peculiar tastes and I am a strange bird at times. So fair warning, eh?
In any event, what I plan to do is to provide a fairly deep dive into the architecture that I’ve come up with. In the standard tradition of all literature scientific and technical, it will be presented in precisely the opposite order in which I actually came up with things – i.e. from the top down, in a semi coherent form that makes sense. Lord knows that actual discoveries and explorations are more a matter of luck in which you discover something and then spend an inordinate amount of time tracking down why the heck you managed to stumble upon it and where it fits in the larger picture of things that you’re trying to map out. I’ve always found this cognitive dissonance amusing, myself, and hope you won’t mind to much when I veer off into seemingly irrelevant paths rather than sticking to the point at hand.
If you’re one of those people who can’t wait until the end of the story to find out what’s going on, by all means download the PDF of my talk on the subject at last year’s Spring Experience entitled Digging the Trenches on the Ninth Level. If you’re not familiar with Dante’s Divine Comedy, then you won’t get the joke. But suffice it to say that I’m a big believer in the principle that every time you solve a problem, you discover ten more problems that you didn’t know you had.
A perfect example of this sometimes perverse law is something as simple as email. Email solved a lot of problems that a modern economy and social population have, but in doing so it created a lot more. Without email, we would never have been subjected to the sublime beauty of penile extension spam nor would your grandmother be subjected to the horror of id phishing which you discover has snagged her bank account and drained all her life’s savings leaving you with a predicament that makes you wonder what all this progress was supposed to do in the first place.
Likewise, I firmly believe that in solving the problems I believe have been addressed by OSGi, Spring DM and management architectures like mine, we’ve inadvertently unleashed new levels of horror that will ensure future generations will curse our names as they suffer from the fall out and live the unspeakable abominations unleashed from these “solutions” and witness them unfold in ways that we couldn’t possibly imagine.
So, with that cheery panorama as the back drop, I’ll end this introductory post and start working on the next post, which provides high level overview and ten dollar tour of the sewers that I’ve been digging for your benefit on the ninth level of hell.
Remember. I dig because I care. After all, you do want that frozen crap to be routed somewhere and dealt with, don’t you?

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C’mon in! The water’s wonderful!

3 thoughts on “Event Driven Autonomic Management – Preliminaries

  1. Event Driven Autonomic Management – The Long Kiss Goodnight

    Part I can be found here From my perspective, one of the major pitfalls in any project which starts out to produce a management infrastructure is that the project almost immediately starts focussing on the API layer rather than the…

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